StudySC is an online resource for K-12 homework help, projects, and more.

StudySC provides teachers with lesson plans and other content to support classroom activities. StudySC is arranged by grade level and subject areas, and it meets South Carolina-specific curriculum standards.

SC People

(1806-1870) Born in Charleston, SC, William Gilmore Simms was a poet, novelist and historian who wrote History of South Carolina (1842), which became a standard school textbook on the state’s history.

(1682-1745) Born in England, Charles Craven was the governor of the colony of South Carolina from 1711-1716 and held office during the end of the Tuscarora War and the beginning of the Yemassee War.

(1739-1800) Born in Charleston, SC, John Rutledge was a signer of the US constitution and the first governor of South Carolina following the signing of the Declaration of Independence.

South Carolina Counties

Saluda County

Saluda County was named for the Saluda River, which forms one of its borders. The county was established in 1895 from part of Edgefield County, and the county seat is the town of Saluda. The Cherokee Indians lived in this area for many years. In 1755 they signed a treaty with the British at their settlement, known as Saluda Old Town. Scotch-Irish and English settlers subsequently began moving into the area, while the Cherokees moved farther to the north. Two famous heroes of the Alamo, William Barrett Travis (1809-1836) and James Butler Bonham (1807-1836) were natives of what is now Saluda County.

Saluda Theatre in Saluda, SC (2016, November 27). Wikimedia Commons. Retrieved 18:55, July 24, 2017

See All Counties

 

Term of the Day

(noun) - a wheel, propelled by running or falling water, used to power machinery

Elementary School

Woven Basket

Learn about the rich Gullah culture that continues in Charleston and the Lowcountry.

Middle School

Gullah artist creating a sweetgrass basket.

Learn about the rich Gullah culture that continues in Charleston and the Lowcountry.

High School

Hallelujah Singers

Learn about the rich Gullah culture that continues in Charleston and the Lowcountry.