Exploration and Colonization

This set of materials is intended to help teachers use history to educate children.

This is a lesson plan from The Powder House, South Carolina's oldest public building.

Students will be able to interpret census data to statistically describe population trends.

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In this activity, students learn about the history of African American English and the meaning of dialect and linguistic patterns. Students watch a video about African American English and analyze the dialect's linguistic patterns.

Developed with the assistance of the teachers at Westview Elementary School in Goose Creek, South Carolina, this package provides detailed curricula materials looking at the religious persecution of the Huguenots, the cultivation and marketing of

Students will research the lifestyles of the Native Americans living in South Carolina during the explorations of Dr. Henry Woodward, the first English explorer to visit this area.

Lessons related to Charles Pinckney National Historic Site, Pinckney Family, the Pinckney Plan, and archaeology at Snee Farm.

To help students gain skills in reading and writing historical journals and in construction and use of related material culture such as quill pens and journals.

Students will learn games that colonial children would have played. After lunch in the covered picnic shelter, students can enjoy the following activities to learn about the past and get active!

This is a lesson plan from The Powder House, South Carolina's oldest public building. The student will identify the three major Native American tribes that existed during colonization.

This is a lesson plan from The Powder House, South Carolina's oldest public building. The teacher will facilitate a discussion on arches. An arch is a curved structure that spans an opening, usually made of stone or other masonry.

This guide was prepared to accompany the S.C. State Museum Traveling Exhibit by the same name, but also provides great stand-alone curricula materials for teaching about Native Americans.

GOAL:To give students the opportunity to relate how early settlers used the knowledge of their ancestors to make some of the necessities needed for survival in the early South Carolina frontier.

This unit focuses on resistance to slavery. Social Studies and literacy skills of comparison and analysis are used. The historical connection of the Emanuel A.M.E.

This is a lesson plan from The Powder House, South Carolina's oldest public building.1. The student will, while working with a group, establish five major requirements for a successful colony and display them in a graphic organizer. 2.

This is a lesson plan from The Powder House, South Carolina's oldest public building. 1. The students will be able to explain the reasons why the Powder Magazine was constructed in the Northwest corner of Charles Town. 2.

Students will be able to visually compare the historical events that took place on and/or near the property of Fort Frederick Heritage Preserve by completing a timeline.

This Teacher's Guide is designed as an informative tool for South Carolina educators.

Students will have the opportunity to learn about the historical techniques of making tabby by constructing structures from a Frosted Flakes or Rice Crispies bar recipes. 

This lesson will enable the students to compare George Washington’s description of South Carolina from 1791 to South Carolina today.

At the end of this activity, the student will be able to:

GOAL:  To introduce students to backcountry lifestyles related to the Battle of Cowpens

Students will examine the subject of heritage tourism by developing cultural heritage promotional materials (i.e. brochure, postcard, website, film). 

The Santa Elena Foundation has lesson plans and inquiry projects related to Santa Elena, a Spanish settlement on what is now Parris Island, South Carolina.

King Charles to King Cotton: South Carolina 1670-1860 is a South Carolina 3rd and 8th Grade program designed by educators affiliated with the following museum properties:

This is a Teachers Resource Guide about Historic Latta Plantation about life as a Yeoman farmer.

The United States has changed in size and shape greatly from our founding in 1776 to the present day.

Students will examine the principle of stratigraphy by building an edible archaeological site.  Follows watching the Fort Frederick Archaeology documentary.

This is a lesson plan from The Powder House, South Carolina's oldest public building.  Students will create a newspaper article that summarizes the story of either Stede Bonnet or Blackbeard, and their interaction with the city of Charleston.

This is a lesson plan from The Powder House, South Carolina's oldest public building. The students will research the story of either, Stede Bonnet, Richard Worley, Anne Bonny, or Blackbeard, and create a visual display that depicts the contributio

This activity is designed to help students learn about techniques used by archaeologists in the lab. Students decorate small ceramic pots and then break them into pieces. Using glue and the students' puzzle power they reassemble their pots.

These questions will help to guide students' reading of 'Cherokee Women' and encourage them to think critically about the text.

Developed in conjunction with the Pee Dee Heritage Center, this package focuses on the Native American use of tobacco, colonial and antebellum cultivation of tobacco, and the development of the bright leaf tobacco industry in the Pee Dee region af

Olaudah Equiano is perhaps one of the most well-known abolitionist writers and former slaves to live in America. His narrative has been digitized as a part of the Documenting the American South North American Slave Narratives collection.

GOAL: To help students understand the importance of the musket and rifle to the early settlers, and identify the difference between the two weapons.

This is a lesson plan from The Powder House, South Carolina's oldest public building. 1. The student will identify three reasons for the location of the defense wall. 2. The student will illustrate the location of the defense wall.

Using replicas of common items, students try to identify the objects and determine the purpose.

At the end of this activity, the student will be able to: - describe conflicts between the Native Americans and Europeans over unfair trade practices.

This lesson provides students an opportunity to read and interpret writings of the late 1500's and to transfer the information provided in the writings into a visual medium as a means of understanding and interpretation.

This lesson is based on the National Register of Historic Places registration files "Georgetown County Rice Culture, c. 1750-c. 1910" and "Chicora Wood Plantation" as well as other source materials on the rice culture of Georgetown County.

Native Americans have been inhabitants of South Carolina for more than 15,000 years. These people contributed in countless ways to the state we call home.