Lesson Plans

Below are descriptions of lesson plans created by schools, educators, museums, state and federal parks, and other educational organizations.

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  • Brigadier General Stephen Twitty

    The students will be able to identify various regions of the United States and other locations in the world.

  • Brigadier General Stephen Twitty

    The students will create an acrostic poem.

  • Brigadier General Stephen Twitty

    The students will:  Be introduced to the life of Brigadier General Stephen M. Twitty. Be introduced to the history of various 20th & 21st-century wars involving the United States and their effects on our country. Discuss symbolism. Create a medal representing the qualities of bravery and freedom using a variety of different visuals and symbols using mixed media.

     

  • Briggs v. Elliott Curriculum

    This curriculum guide and resource booklet was prepared by descendants of a few determined black people who lived in Clarendon County, South Carolina, during the 1940s. Their parents' actions in a quest for equality, their efforts to get their piece of the “American Dream,” changed the course of United States history. The series of events that our foreparents started became the legal case of Briggs et al. v. Elliott et al. This was the first case to reach the United States Supreme Court that challenged the constitutionality of segregated educational facilities.

  • Brother Against Brother

    GOAL:  To understand the civil war nature of the American Revolution in the South. (The highest number and most violent engagements of the war took place in the South. It was in the south that the Patriots secured victory.)

  • Brown v. Board: Five Communities That Changed America

    This lesson is based on the National Historic Landmark Nominations, Robert Russa Moton High School (with photographs), Sumner and Monroe Elementary Schools (with photographs), Howard High School(with photographs),and John Philip Sousa Middle School (with photographs), as well as the National Register Nomination for Summerton High School and the National Historic Landmark Survey theme study entitled Racial Desegregation in Public Education in the United States.

    Objectives

  • Brown versus Board of Education: Rhetoric and realities

    In this lesson, students will listen to three oral histories that shed light on political and personal reactions toward the 1954 Supreme Court ruling Brown versus Board of Education. Though the ruling itself is not mentioned, words like "integration" and "forced busing" refer to the social outcomes as perceived by the speakers.

  • Build a Glider

    Focus Question: How do you construct a glider that achieves neutral buoyancy in both fresh and salt water? Objectives: Students will: 1. Discuss content in relation to the need for neutral buoyancy for oceanic deployment of instrumentation such as a glider. 2. Design and construct a glider which is neutrally buoyant in fresh water. 3. Make necessary adjustments to enable the glider to remain neutrally buoyant in salt water 4. Understand some of the frustrations that research scientist face when testing their instruments.

  • Build Your Own Buoy

    Basic Observation Buoy (BOB) is a floating platform with the capacity to carry a suite of environmental sensors. BOBs can be moored to the ocean bottom in sheltered places with very small waves or to a dock in quiet waters. 

  • Building An Army (American Revolution)

    This activity will enable students to better understand the makeup of an army in the American Revolution, and thus begin to have an appreciation for the human cost of war.

  • Building an Army (Civil War)

    To the non-military buff, the organization and terminology used for Civil War armies can be very confusing. The Union and the Confederate Armies had different names depending upon their location. But despite the many names both of the armies were organized in a similar fashion including a structure of corps, divisions, and brigades. But what were these different organizations and how did they all fit in to one huge force?

  • Byrnes Legacy

    A lesson plan using an article from the Sandlapper Magazine about James Francis Byrnes and the Byrnes Scholar program.

  • Calculating Loggerhead Hatchling Success Rates

    Measuring the success of sea turtle nests and hatchlings is essential to monitoring the health of a local sea turtle population. The data can be used to develop information such as effectiveness of the management program, individual female reproductive health, estimates of future adult populations, and effects of weather phenomena (i.e. hurricanes, El Niño-Southern Oscillation events).

  • Call-and-Response in the African-American Spiritual

    Activities related to call-and-response in songs: "Got On My Travelin' Shoes," "Jonah," "Eli, Eli (Somebody Call Eli)."

  • Camouflage This!

    The students will:

    • Identify coastal animals that use camouflage for protection from predators.
    • Recreate camouflage patterns
  • Canoeing Through Our State with the First South Carolinians

    This lesson is designed to help students identify the location of Native American tribes at the time of European exploration and describe their relationship to the rivers. Students will also compare and contrast the cultures and governance of Native Americans in the different geographic regions of South Carolina. This should be preceded by a lesson about the geographic landform regions of South Carolina.

  • Capsule of South Carolina

    This activity will help students understand what an artifact is and think about South Carolina (or relevant time period/culture) through artifacts. 

  • Carbon in the Column

    Focus Question: How can we count the number of plankton in the water column?

    Objectives: The student will be able to: 1. Count a sample of plankton on a microscope slide. 2. Identify available plankton on a prepared slide by utilizing an available reference key. 3. Extrapolate a population study of plankton from a limited count of specific plankton utilizing a grid counting mechanism. "

  • Carolina Crunch! Exploring Food Webs in the South Carolina Saltmarsh

    This lesson explores food webs using organisms from the South Carolina Salt Marsh. Students read about the organisms and have to put together their own food web from the information provided. After making the food web students answer questions about food webs and must exhibit understanding of new vocabulary (e.g. omnivore, predator, producer).

  • Carolina Crunch! Exploring Food Webs in the South Carolina Saltmarsh

    This lesson explores food webs using organisms from the South Carolina Salt Marsh. Students read about the organisms and have to put together their own food web from the information provided. After making the food web students answer questions about food webs and must exhibit understanding of new vocabulary (e.g. omnivore, predator, producer).