Middle School

To the non-military buff, the organization and terminology used for Civil War armies can be very confusing. The Union and the Confederate Armies had different names depending upon their location.

Armies during the American Revolution were more structured and organized than we often give them credit for.

This lesson is based on the National Register of Historic Places documentation for “The Stockade” and “Florence National Cemetery,” part of the “Civil War Era National Cemeteries MPS;" and on archival and archeological research sponsored by the U.

This is an educators guide  for use in the classroom as a resource to teaching the Holocaust, which includes information on SC and Columbia survivors.

Students will explore the biotic and abiotic characteristics of the intertidal zone.

Just as the Revolutionary War prompted the Continental Congress to issue paper currency, the financing of the Civil War provided the catalyst for the continuing evolution of U.S. currency. In 1861, the U.S.

In this lesson, students will label a map of the USA and CSA in 1861, describe the events surrounding the construction of the various submarine vessels, and will read descriptions of each submarine and compare each submarine.

In this lesson, students will create a web design to chart the effects of tourism on South Carolina.

This set of materials is intended to help teachers use history to educate children.

In this lesson plan, students read an article about the slave trade in West Africa, which caused the kidnapping of millions of free West Africans by slave traders.

This activity provides an interactive look at photography from the Civil War. Participants examine a set of photographs and later place those shots into the historical context of the Civil War.

Political leaders and parties in the tense time after the Civil War proposed various plans for Reconstruction.

Students will be able to analyze data in a rose plot and determine preferred orientations.

Students will be able to interpret census data to statistically describe population trends.

Right-Click and select "Open Link in New Tab" to download the lesson plan documents.

Property: The Big Apple, 1000 Hampton St., Columbia, SC 29201 

Historic Content 

In this lesson, students take on the work of a historian by analyzing political cartoons create from the perspective of a local WWI soldier.

In this lesson plan, students will look at photographs of women and discuss their first impressions. After listening to an excerpt from an oral history, students will gain empathy for a flood survivor of 1999's Hurricane Floyd.

This revised edition of A Teacher’s Guide to African American Historic Places in South Carolina includes sites identified and approved by The National Register of Historic Places or the South Carolina Historical Marker Program and correla

In this lesson students analyze documents that explore the untold lives of Free Blacks in Antebellum South Carolina.

Students will:

Students will learn: 1) what an adaptation is; and 2) to research a specific mollusk.

The University of Georgia's Marine Extension Service (UGA MAREX) published the Adopt-A-Wetland Curriculum Guide for Grades 3-12 for classroom and informal activities that are aligned to classroom standards.

In this activity, students learn about the history of African American English and the meaning of dialect and linguistic patterns. Students watch a video about African American English and analyze the dialect's linguistic patterns.

Charleston, South Carolina provides an excellent setting to teach students about several key concepts in the study of slavery and freedom in the United States.

Questions discussed in this lesson plan are: *What were duties and responsibilities of African-American soldiers in the American Revolution? *How did African Americans make significant contributions during the American Revolution?

African Passages is an online exhibit consisting of 49 image resources (photographs, maps, and documents) and 35 extended captions that commemorate the Ashley River Corridor in Charleston, South Carolina, as a unique site of memory in the history

Property: Hodge Hall, South Carolina State University, Orangeburg 

Historic Content 

In this lesson students evaluate the damage caused by the Charleston Earthquake of 1886 through photographic evidence.

This lesson contains information & hands-on activities where 6-8 grade students will be learning about careers in agriculture. Our goal for this lesson is to help students explore the vast array of agricultural careers.

This lesson contains information & hands-on activities for teaching grades 6-8 about whole food plants, specifically fruits & vegetables.

Students will be introduced to Allendale, SC, as they learn about its prosperity in the 1950s and its economic loss in the 1990s.

This site was designed to offer basic information on South Carolina's barrier islands for both educators and non-educators alike. It offers background content and images for educators to use in teaching marine science. 

In this lesson, students will learn about the life experiences of slaves in the United States during the 1800s by reading the story of a North Carolina slave woman who eventually escaped.

This lesson is designed to serve as an introduction to the new South Carolina Atlas. It will review the characteristics of the several types of maps contained therein which the students have previously studied.

A lesson plan using an article from the Sandlapper Magazine about Judges Sol Blatt Jr. and Matthew Perry Jr.

This lesson utilizes a primary source and provides students with insight of some of artillery types used during the Civil War. Students will be able to analyze a photograph for content and describe different elements in a photograph.

Discover the animals and plants that also call South Carolina home.

In this lesson, students write free-verse acrostic poems about archaeology using the letters of the word "archaeology" to begin each line.

Learn about art styles and folk art that have been popular in South Carolina.

Meet historical and contemporary painters, folk artists, architects, and other artists who have worked and lived in South Carolina.

This lesson is designed to help students become more familiar with the landform regions of South Carolina, those areas of South Carolina with similar economic activities, life styles, and who share similar landscapes.

Students, who are already familiar with the overall story of the H.L.

Meet historical and contemporary authors and illustrators who have worked and lived in South Carolina.

Students will learn about the major battles of the Revolutionary war through the Internet and streaming videos.

Developed with the assistance of the teachers at Westview Elementary School in Goose Creek, South Carolina, this package provides detailed curricula materials looking at the religious persecution of the Huguenots, the cultivation and marketing of

This activity enlightens eighth graders on the life of Bertie Herbert Bowman. They will have a better understanding of the term "the American Dream", and they will see how Bowman achieved his American dream.

 

This activity enlightens eighth graders on the life of Bertie Herbert Bowman. They will have a better understanding of the term "Exodusters," and they will see how exodusters affected Bowman's life.

There are hundreds of historical photographs pertaining to Hobcaw Barony and the Baruch family, most of which are archived at the Georgetown County Digital Library (http://www.gcdigital.org/).

This lesson contains information & hands-on activities where 6-8 grade students will be learning about the effect that our local Food Environment has on the food choices we make and ultimately the food we eat.

The students will be able to explain the contributions of individuals from South Carolina and how they influenced the history of United States.

Students will be able to: 1. describe important events in the life of Bishop Daniel Alexander Payne; 2. identify three key aspects of the educational opportunities available to African Americans living in the south in the 1800s; and 3.

The students will: Be introduced to the life of Bishop Daniel Alexander Payne. Be introduced to stain glass painting, its history, and purpose. Create a "stain glass" painting on canvas using the media of acrylic paint.

This lesson introduces students to historic primary and secondary source documents and geospatial technology to explore nineteenth-century slavery and trade between the Caribbean and United States.

In this activity students will analyze a two-page poster that the Government used to recruit recently freed slaves to fight for the Union Army during the Civil War.

The students will:  Be introduced to the life of Brigadier General Stephen M. Twitty. Be introduced to the history of various 20th & 21st-century wars involving the United States and their effects on our country. Discuss symbolism.

This curriculum guide and resource booklet was prepared by descendants of a few determined black people who lived in Clarendon County, South Carolina, during the 1940s.

GOAL:  To understand the civil war nature of the American Revolution in the South. (The highest number and most violent engagements of the war took place in the South. It was in the south that the Patriots secured victory.)

This lesson is based on the National Historic Landmark Nominations, Robert Russa Moton High School (with photographs), Sumner and Monroe Elementary Schools (with photographs), Howard High School(with photographs),and John Philip Sousa Middle Schoo

In this lesson, students will listen to three oral histories that shed light on political and personal reactions toward the 1954 Supreme Court ruling Brown versus Board of Education.

This activity will enable students to better understand the makeup of an army in the American Revolution, and thus begin to have an appreciation for the human cost of war.

To the non-military buff, the organization and terminology used for Civil War armies can be very confusing. The Union and the Confederate Armies had different names depending upon their location.

A lesson plan using an article from the Sandlapper Magazine about James Francis Byrnes and the Byrnes Scholar program.

Measuring the success of sea turtle nests and hatchlings is essential to monitoring the health of a local sea turtle population.

Activities related to call-and-response in songs: "Got On My Travelin' Shoes," "Jonah," "Eli, Eli (Somebody Call Eli)."

This activity will help students understand what an artifact is and think about South Carolina (or relevant time period/culture) through artifacts. 

This lesson explores food webs using organisms from the South Carolina Salt Marsh. Students read about the organisms and have to put together their own food web from the information provided.

This lesson explores food webs using organisms from the South Carolina Salt Marsh. Students read about the organisms and have to put together their own food web from the information provided.

Students will research the lifestyles of the Native Americans living in South Carolina during the explorations of Dr. Henry Woodward, the first English explorer to visit this area.

Students plot high and low tidal data points using a tide chart. Students will make predictions from their graph.

Students will investigate how different salinities affect living cells.

Lessons related to Charles Pinckney National Historic Site, Pinckney Family, the Pinckney Plan, and archaeology at Snee Farm.

In this lesson, students will learn about what life was like for a child worker: how much money the workers earned, how many hours they worked each day, what their homes were like, and what they did for fun.

Learn about the rights and responsibilities that come with being a South Carolina and United States citizen.

GOAL: To introduce to students the connection of citizenship to ideals of the American Revolution and to demonstrate the importance of civic responsibility and participatory choices in American constitutional government.

Students will compare and contrast "Civil Disobedience" and "Nonviolent resistance" during the Civil Rights era in N.C.

Many South Carolinians participated in the struggle for equal rights, including Septima Poinsette Clark, Modjeska Monteith Simkins, and the participants in the landmark Briggs v. Elliott court case.

From the Battle of Fort Sumter to Sherman’s March and Robert Smalls, South Carolina played a significant role in the American Civil War.

In this lesson, students will use one of the major tools of a historian: personal letters.

This activity shows students how both in the North and in the South, music was used extensively during the Civil War to rally troops and the public.

This is a Teachers Resource Guide about Historic Latta Plantation about the daily life of a Civil War soldier. 

Civil War field artillery was organized in batteries. Although it varied from time to time, a battery in the Union army consisted of six of the same kind of cannons.

Students will research the weapons and military strategies used during the Civil War and will review military terminology. - Students will collect pictures of Civil War weapons and research the purpose of each.

In this lesson students will simulate an archaeological survey to recognize and use basic archaeological procedures. Students will determine how sites and artifacts relate information about human behavior.

Every place on Earth has distinguishing characteristics that make it unique. Generally, places on Earth are described in terms of physical and cultural characteristics.

The students will:  Identify coastal plants and animals; Identify basic habitat needs (food, water, shelter, and space) of these animals and plants.

A lesson plan using the Sandlapper Magazine about colleges and universities in the state.

To help students gain skills in reading and writing historical journals and in construction and use of related material culture such as quill pens and journals.

Students will compare and contrast military recruitment posters to analyze various perspectives regarding the role of African Americans during the Civil War.

Using multiple primary sources to build analytical and corroborative skills to examine the circumstances surrounding Daniel Morgan’s decision to fight when and where he chose.

Composting: A Guide for South Carolina Schools provides recommendations for collecting organic material at school, selecting and placing bins as well as actually composting.

A lesson plan about federal property confiscated by the Confederacy.

Using primary sources from the Documenting the American South collection, students will engage in a brief simulation of inflation during the Civil War while learning about issues faced on the home front in North Carolina.

This lesson provides the opportunity for students to examine a Civil War battle in depth to document the event, either in a newspaper article or op-ed piece or as a blog or social media post.

Cooperating Associations operate the bookstores in National Parks. These cooperating associations donate part of the proceeds from book and souvenir sales to the parks.

GOAL: To have students assess the importance of leadership at the Battle of Cowpens.

Students will be able to analyze the literacy genre of narrative poetry.

Students will:

The purpose of this activity is to get students to think critically about human-induced impacts on sea turtle populations and to consider ways to help citizens realize the extent of the problem and, more importantly, how they can help alleviate th

After this program students will be able to: 

  • Exhibit how Civil War soldiers lived on a daily basis.
  • Identify and interpret the items that were taken with a soldier on campaign.

From The Big Apple to the Carolina Shag and the Charleston, South Carolina has been influential in lots of dance styles.

This educator guide focuses on the contributions of the enslaved potter and poet, David Drake, who labored in the pottery industry that flourished in the Edgefield District of South Carolina in the 1800s.

Objective: To enlighten students about the development, culture, history, geography, and achievements of Mitchelville, the USA’s first planned town for recently enslaved Americans of African descent on Hilton Head Island, SC.

In this lesson, students will contrast and compare de facto and de jure segregation, listening to oral history examples of each from residents of Charlotte, North Carolina.

Fortifications are the result of adaptations over centuries of use. When military technology changed, such as the invention of the cannon, fortifications adapted. During the Civil War military technology changed drastically.

GOAL: To present to students a brief history of the Cowpens National Battlefield and of facts pertaining to the park.

This activity is designed to introduce students to archaeology by having them find the definition of archaeology in the readings, and discover how math and science help us learn about the past.

In this lesson, students clean up litter from their school grounds and then conduct a microscopic study of the litter to identify what kind of organisms are growing in it.

These activities are related to digitized documents from the National Archives relating to Brown v. Board of Education.

The student will study various forms of drawing including medical illustration.   The student will draw from life.

The student will investigate the history of African American in medicine and create a graphic organizer.

GOAL:To give students the opportunity to relate how early settlers used the knowledge of their ancestors to make some of the necessities needed for survival in the early South Carolina frontier.

A lesson plan using an article from the Sandlapper Magazine about Earthquakes in the state.

Students will be introduced to, or given the opportunity to review, several basic economic concepts through the use of various thematic content maps and discussion questions.

Students investigate the effect of water temperature on the metabolic rate of a cold blooded invertebrate, the oyster.

This unit focuses on resistance to slavery. Social Studies and literacy skills of comparison and analysis are used. The historical connection of the Emanuel A.M.E.

This lesson focuses on cause and effect and the evaluation of multiple points of view or biases that create the perspectives and influences of individual experiences, societal values, and cultural traditions.

Students will learn: 1) what endangered, threatened, and extinct means; 2) what mollusks in your area are endangered or threatened and what mollusks have become extinct; 3) why mollusks become endangered, threatened, or extinct; and 4) what we can

"Environmental Clubs: A Guide for South Carolina Schools," developed by the S.C.

Sea turtles, like many reptiles, exhibit a form of environmental sex determination called temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD).

Learn more about the plantation system, politics, and culture of antebellum South Carolina.

Discover French, Spanish, and British colonies along the coast and find out how colonists explored, settled, and lived.

Several activities exploring plate tectonics. Unit 1 has: continental drift hypothesis, defining the plate boundaries, and lithospheric plates.

Students explore the Documenting the American South Collection titled, the "Church in the Southern Black Community. Beginning with a historian's interpretation of the primary sources that make up the collection, students search the collection for

Discover facts, trivia, and state symbols from all over our unique state.

The United States federal government works to create, enforce, and apply laws for the entire country, including South Carolina.

An identification guide to over 700 common organisms in the Piedmont of the Carolinas & Georgia, including mammals, birds, insects, fungi, plants, molds, and bones.

Meet the Native Americans who first called South Carolina home.

There are lots of foods, ingredients, and cooking styles that have been popular in South Carolina.

This lesson contains information & hands-on activities where 6-8 grade students will be learning about plants and how components in nature interact with each other in ecosystems.

An interactive gaming activity that illustrates the complexity of the estuarine food webs.

 

This teacher's guide to sixth grade Forest Science is designed to help you teach a basic overview of South Carolina forestry.

This teacher's guide to seventh grade Forest Science is designed to help you present the basic tenets of managing the forest resource in South Carolina.

Students will be able to visually compare the historical events that took place on and/or near the property of Fort Frederick Heritage Preserve by completing a timeline.

The Fort Sumter Teacher’s Guide is designed as an informative tool for South Carolina educators. The National Park Service values education and strives to help students and teachers learn the unique history of special places.

This Teacher's Guide is designed as an informative tool for South Carolina educators.

Students will have the opportunity to learn about the historical techniques of making tabby by constructing structures from a Frosted Flakes or Rice Crispies bar recipes. 

This lesson contains information & hands on activities for teaching grades 6-8 about the Certified South Carolina Grown Program & the differences between fruits & vegetables.

In this group activity, children will play a game loosely based on Civil War signaling and naval strategy. 

This activity highlights the variety (types and sizes) of geocache containers as well as the plethora of devices used to provide the coordinates of the geocache’s hidden location.

Using geocaching as a vehicle, students will analyze and compare choropleth maps showing geocache finds at the county and state level.

This activity allows students to explore the geography around a selected geocache, whether or not the geocache will actually be visited.

This lesson will enable the students to compare George Washington’s description of South Carolina from 1791 to South Carolina today.

The students will study grassroots political campaigns, public service announcements, and activism. Students will discuss the merits of social media such as viral YouTube videos as a means communicating ideas of social and community issues.

South Carolinians during the Great Depression faced significant hardships, only relieved with the economic relief of World War II.

The Guide to the Elementary Basic Observation Buoy (eBOB) will assist with setting the stage for designing and constructing an eBOB.

Learn about the rich Gullah culture that continues in Charleston and the Lowcountry.

Gullah Geechee is a culture located on the Sea Islands of South Carolina and Georgia.

GOAL:  To introduce students to backcountry lifestyles related to the Battle of Cowpens

Students will examine the subject of heritage tourism by developing cultural heritage promotional materials (i.e. brochure, postcard, website, film). 

South Carolina had a system of government as a British colony that evolved into a state government after the American Revolution.

Students will learn about Fort Lamar and the Battle of Secessionville by reading letters from Alexander Campbell and James Campbell, two Scottish brothers who fought on opposing sides in the battle.

Summarize the Battle of Cowpens.

Lesson Objectives: Students recognize the impact of the Holocaust on postwar and future generations, Students begin to understand the importance of moral decision making in both their individual and public lives., Students learn to appreciate thei

The population in South Carolina experienced changes between 1900 and 1950.

Students investigate senses through the feeding behaviors of mud snails and design their own test apparatus.

 

Find out about transportation, environmental issues, and other ways South Carolinians and the environment interact.

This activity precedes the use of the poster and this will be where the children will be exposed to the organisms in the saltmarsh, feeding relationships, and the effects of disturbances on our natural resource, the salt marsh.

Students will analyze historical newspaper articles regarding European expansionist policy during the Nineteenth century, explain the concept of European imperialism during the nineteenth century, and provide specific examples of European expansio

Developed with the assistance of Roche Carolina, Inc., this curricula material explores the history and archaeology of a section of Florence County.

Industry came to South Carolina as entire families worked in the textile mills and factories in the Upstate.

The Santa Elena Foundation has lesson plans and inquiry projects related to Santa Elena, a Spanish settlement on what is now Parris Island, South Carolina.

This curricula package was originally developed for use by Charleston County Park and Recreation at its new Tea Farm Park.

The lesson will explore the greenhouse effect through a simple demonstration. Students will gain an understanding of the greenhouse effect, climate change, and global warming.

Medical science was just beginning to be understood at the onset of the Civil War. Germs were unheard of, and surgery techniques had not been improved since the early 1800's. Hospitals were rarely used since most sicknesses was treated at home.

The student will demonstrate knowledge about art careers related to the entertainment and fashion industries through studio and written products.

The students will be able to describe individuals from South Carolina and how they impacted entertainment.

The students will be able to explain the contributions of individuals from South Carolina and how they influenced the history of United States.

Through collage, the student will create an image that conveys a message of social importance.

The students will be able to explain the contributions of individuals from South Carolina and how they influenced the history of United States.

Students will respond to informational and literary texts through a friendly letter or email.

In this lesson, students create a political cartoon after reading about John C. Calhoun’s “Strange Dream”.

This educator guide explores the special nature of African-American celebrations within the family and community, and encourages students to discover their own cultural heritage.

King Charles to King Cotton: South Carolina 1670-1860 is a South Carolina 3rd and 8th Grade program designed by educators affiliated with the following museum properties:

Learn how the people of South Carolina use the land to grow crops, mine minerals, and fish in the rivers.

GOAL: To have students contrast and compare the leadership styles of Daniel Morgan and Banastre Tarleton at the Battle of Cowpens in context of the Revolutionary War.

To soldiers, letters from home provided encouragement and welcomed information. During the Civil War these letters would arrive one to three months after they were written. It did not matter to the soldiers.

GOAL: To be able to personalize and better understand certain aspects of the cultural, natural and social histories of the time and place of the Battle of Cowpens.

This is a Teachers Resource Guide about Historic Latta Plantation about life as a Yeoman farmer.

To provide the opportunity for students to identify clothing of the Revolutionary War Era in comparison with modern clothing.

This lesson is designed to give students an introduction and an understanding of the conditions of the different social classes in the Antebellum South. Students will identify the various social classes and compare them.

This lesson provides an excellent bridge into the study of the Reconstruction era. Students will examine the roles of the president that have evolved through history and the powers of the president as prescribed in Article II of the U.S.

Read poetry, folklore, and ghost stories from South Carolina.

Each county, city, and town in South Carolina have their own government and responsibilities.

The sea turtles' unique life history compounds the negative effects caused by the multitude of anthropogenic, or human-induced, threats these animals face.

How does the Charleston Bump affect water flow in the Gulf Stream, what is the impact of these effects on biological communities, and what processes produce the rock-like surface of the Charleston Bump?

In this lesson plan, students read a primary source document to learn about the life of Lunsford Lane, a slave who worked in the city of Raleigh, North Carolina.

This activity is designed to help the students express themselves through visual symbolism. Each student will use air-drying clay to make a clay gorget to take home that says something about them.

Explore physical, political, historical, and thematic maps of South Carolina.

Focus Question: What types of equipment is needed on a marine research ship? Objectives: The students will be able to: 1. Understand the types of equipment necessary for a marine research vessel. 2.

Students will study pattern and composition in quilt work. Students will look at family photographs and create a "quilt square" that will communicate a story of their heritage.

GOAL: To introduce to students material culture and music related to the Battle of Cowpens.

GOAL: To introduce to students material culture related to the Battle of Cowpens.

This activity is designed help students learn how to measure and record using both the English and Metric systems.

Since the establishment of the first textile mills in South Carolina in the early 1840s, mill towns have been a part of our state's landscape.

Detailed descriptions of archaeological sites and artifacts are important during an excavation. Sometimes archaeologists are not sure what an artifact was used for.

Explore our state's participation in modern wars, increased infrastructure, and economic development in the "New South."

Students will be able to create a talk show or newscast interview with Daniel Morgan and Banastre Tarleton.

Utilizing six fundamental historical concepts, students will break down and critically analyze Daniel Morgan’s innovative plan of Battle at Cowpens.

South Carolina is home to a wide variety of musical styles and traditions.

Traditional Music

Did you know that South Carolina is home to a rich musical heritage?

Some loggerhead turtles hatch on the east coast of the United States into the Atlantic Ocean. The baby turtles are known to swim directly into the waves and spend their juvenile years growing in the vegetative waters known as the Sargasso Sea.

This lesson contains information & hands on activities for teaching grades 6-8 about the first meal of the day: BREAKFAST. Our goal for this lesson is to encourage children to start the day right with a healthy breakfast.

GOAL: To introduce students to Catawba and Cherokee culture in the Revolutionary Era Carolinas and have them access the role of each in the American Revolution.

Learn about Native American culture both before European contact and today.

Visual Arts

Native American artists in South Carolina make pottery, weaving, and other arts.

Students will explore various Native American tribes of South Carolina. They will make a brochure to share information on Native Americans location, population, clothing, homes, and food.

From earthquakes to hurricanes and droughts, South Carolina faces many different kinds of natural disasters.

This lesson focuses on cause and effect and helping students understand responsible citizenship in relation to the state, national, and international communities in which they belong.

Students often learn about the history's major events, but sometimes lack the understanding of local experiences.

In this lesson, students will learn about how philanthropy and the Progressive Era improved education in the South.

A lesson plan using an article from the Sandlapper Magazine about author Tom Poland and Highway 76.

This activity is comprised of three lessons and labs focusing on carbon dioxide, strengths and properties of acids and bases, and interpreting and graphing real data pertaining to ocean acidification.

Included in the kit are images from and educational materials based on the exhibition Our Time, Our Place: Photographs of the Black South by Richard Samuel Roberts, which depicts the rise of African American middle class across the South

What do soldiers wear? Students will say a uniform and mention boots.

Students use observations to investigate the differences among two oyster clusters.

This lab-based activity engages students in observational research. It builds on their experiences with an estuarine organism, the oyster.

Summarize the Battle of Cowpens.

The students will relate the events preceding and at the Battle of Sullivan’s Island, will analyze two primary documents describing the battle and then compare and contrast the descriptions, and will locate the major components in the battle on a

This lesson allows students an opportunity to examine the critical role of tourism in our state, which is the second leading industry. Students will discuss why South Carolina is a popular tourism destination.

Students will examine the principle of stratigraphy by building an edible archaeological site.  Follows watching the Fort Frederick Archaeology documentary.

The Pendleton Historic Foundation has created a series of activities including questions, Venn Diagram exercise, crossword puzzle, and timeline that relate to 19th century plantation life. 

GOAL:To have students learn about the personal effects carried by soldiers during the American Revolution.

This activity is comprised of three lessons and labs focusing on ocean acidification, pH, impacts of carbon dioxide on water chemistry, and sources and sinks of carbon.

Discover the mountains, lakes & rivers, geology, and climate of South Carolina.

This lesson is designed to help students become familiar with their state of South Carolina and the variety of features, conditions, and opportunities it can offer.

In South Carolina, loggerhead sea turtles lay about 120 eggs per nest. The female turtle digs out the pear-shaped nest cavity with her hind flippers.

This is a Teachers Resource Guide about Historic Latta Plantation about farming and plantation life.

A lesson plan using an article from the Sandlapper Magazine about historic preservation and tourism.

This lesson focuses on cause and effect, a Social Studies skill, and citing evidence, a literacy skill. Students will compare and contrast, take a stance, and support the stance with evidence.

Meet black legislators, sharecroppers, and white farm owners who rebuilt the South after the Civil War.

Explore the 5 regions of South Carolina and find out what makes each of them unique.

Explore the 5 regions of South Carolina and find out what makes each of them unique.

Explore the 5 regions of South Carolina and find out what makes each of them unique.

Explore the 5 regions of South Carolina and find out what makes each of them unique.

Explore the 5 regions of South Carolina and find out what makes each of them unique.

Soldiers, leaders, and statesmen from South Carolina were pivotal in our nation’s fight for independence.

The students will be able to explain the contributions of individuals from South Carolina and how they influenced the history of United States.

Students will learn about the life and exploits of Robert Smalls, a slave in Charleston during the Civil War who gained his freedom by stealing a Confederate ship.

Students will learn about different types of rock art and how the geology of South Carolina determines where we find both prehistoric and historic petroglyphs

Students will learn about the natural materials used by Paleolithic people to create rock art, use similar materials to create paint, and use paint to replicate paleolithic rock art.

Students will learn how rock art is a valuable cultural artifact and must be protected from natural degradation and human destruction, while also remaining open and available to the public.

Several activities based on Lowcountry cuisine and food.  

Students will be able to illustrate a Salt Marsh food web. Students will learn the ecological importance of the Salt Marsh and the environmental impact provided. Students will learn the importance of Spartina grass to the Salt Marsh.

Barbecue has been a South Carolina tradition for hundreds of years. Today, the state can be divided into four regions depending on which type sauce (tomato, ketchup, mustard, or vinegar & pepper) is preferred.

Learn more about the places of South Carolina and discover images of our state, from its earliest settlers to modern day.

This lesson will help the student to compare the population of cities along South Carolina major interstates.

A lesson plan using an article from the Sandlapper Magazine about South Carolina Secession.

This lesson briefly discusses the Constitution (to be covered in more detail in a later lesson), Articles of Confederation, and the signers of the Constitution from South Carolina.

This lesson is designed to help students gain a better understanding of the terrain, geographic zones and planes of South Carolina and to get an understanding of how much of the Revolution was fought in South Carolina.

On the following pages are basic ingredients for a science fair project and tips for a great display as well as suggestions for making a great presentation.

This lesson will cover an overview of the campaign for Morris Island, have students compares two primary sources from the siege, and work in teams to build a siege work called a gabion that was used in the siege.

This lesson will cover an overview of the campaign for Morris Island, have students compares two primary sources from the siege, and work in teams to build a siege work called a gabion that was used in the siege.

This is a measuring and analysis lab activity in which students determine size variations within an oyster cluster.

Slavery in South Carolina originally existed along the coastal area. Slaves were needed to work the large plantations in the area, and they were brought to South Carolina on ships from the West Indies.

The cash crop economy of South Carolina relied on the slavery of African-Americans.

This learning activity engages students in an analysis of multiple primary sources relating to slavery in the antebellum South from the Library of Congress.

This lesson contains information & hands-on activities for teaching grades 6-8 about the benefits of Smart Food Choices.

In the classroom, students will investigate the use of solar power and the effects of solar power on art. Students will create a design using the sun. This lesson will explain the importance of solar energy as it pertains to art.

This activity is for students to become familiar with foods common to 18th century soldiers and the quantities needed to sustain an army of the time.

Soldiers in the 18th century received a daily ration of food. This was usually of low quality, and many times minimal in amount. These meager amounts, though, added up, creating a major logistical challenge for the army.

The Blue Ridge, which includes portions of Oconee, Pickens, Greenville, and Spartanburg counties, is the smallest of the five landform regions being studied in this series.

The Coastal Zone is the region of the state where creeks and rivers are affected by the ebb and flow of ocean tides.

The word "piedmont" means "foot of the mountain." This region is hilly and comprises approximately one third of the state.

The students will use their artistic skills to design a map that will identify the six lanform regions found in South Carolina. The students will use their research skills to find out informaiton about a city in South Carolina.

This lesson is designed to help students gain a better understanding of the many opportunities that South Carolina offers.

As a class, students will develop a portrait of the state of South Carolina similar to Nam June Paink's Electronic Superhighway.  Each student will be responsible for creating at least one representation of a South Carolina county.

The South Carolina government and its three branches govern the state and its citizens.

This is an online storewater pollution workbook with online and offline activities. 

Questions discussed in this lesson plan are:

Students will be able to:

In this lesson students analyze the workings of South Carolina’s textile industry using photographic evidence. Students then work as museum curators to create exhibits that help record history.

GOAL: To have students abstract information relevant to the battle, its participants and geography through the use of an original source.

GOAL: To show students how Carolina backcountry geography affected the course of the Battle of Cowpens.

GOAL: To help students gain skills in understanding a primary (original) historical source, i.e., a journal as it relates to the Battle of Cowpens.

Includes two new energy lessons, as well as lessons in air quality, ocean and coastal resources, waste reduction and recycling and water. 

This lesson addresses the problematic existence of one Freedman college in South Carolina established during the reconstruction era.

This field trip focuses on the maritime forest at Edisto Beach State Park located on Edisto Island, SC. The maritime forest is bordered by salt marsh and contains plant species typically found in most local maritime forest ecosystem.

GOAL: To demonstrate to students how exotic and invasive species are changing the Cowpens National Battlefield landscape in the context of comparative changes nationwide.

Developed in conjunction with the Pee Dee Heritage Center, this package focuses on the Native American use of tobacco, colonial and antebellum cultivation of tobacco, and the development of the bright leaf tobacco industry in the Pee Dee region af

Compilation of facts, short stories, and activities from 5 southeastern states bordering the Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico that focuses on the growing problem marine debris.

Covers energy production, distribution and consumption in South Carolina, and is targeted to middle and high school students.

This is a set of activities about the beach for middle school teachers and their students. 

The recent discovery and raising of the lost submarine, the CSS Hunley, has answered many historical questions. The subsequent opening of the boat and examination of the artifacts within has answered more.

This lesson looks at the activities of the Hunley in Charleston, South Carolina and the impact the Hunley had on the Civil War.

These nine lesson plans are designed for students to understand the story of the Hunley, from its beginnings in New Orleans to the fateful night of the sinking of the Housatonic.

Olaudah Equiano is perhaps one of the most well-known abolitionist writers and former slaves to live in America. His narrative has been digitized as a part of the Documenting the American South North American Slave Narratives collection.

GOAL: To help students understand the importance of the musket and rifle to the early settlers, and identify the difference between the two weapons.

Students will be given the opportunity to become familiar with the landform regions of South Carolina through their exploration of the Palmetto Trail. They will map the trail and produce a booklet designed to help those who use the trail. 

Property: Penn School / Penn Center Historic District, 16 Penn Center Circle W., St. Helena Island, SC 29920 

Historic Content 

At the end of the activity, students will be able to:

  • Interpret why poor medical practices killed many soldiers.
  • Demonstrate and describe how care was given to wounded soldiers in Civil War hospitals.

This lesson is designed to give students a better understanding of the recruitment of the final Hunley crew and the training the men underwent.

This lesson is based on the National Register of Historic Places Multiple Property Covers "The Rosenwald School Building Fund and Associated Buildings (Alabama)," "Rosenwald Schools in Georgia, 1912-1937," "Rosenwald Schools of Anne Arundel County

Students will learn about the ecology of coastal salt marshes and how the location of Fort Lamar near these marshes affected the outcome of the Battle of Secessionville.

Students will be introduced to the Old Santee Canal and the Santee Cooper Project. They will become familiar with the two topics, map specific locations, and weigh the positive and negative aspects of the project. 

 

Have students identify the Scots-Irish and explain their role in the Carolina Backcountry during the American Revolution.

Students will be able to infer why the brown alga, Sargassum, is likely to be home to many marine organisms. Students can infer that the populations of organisms in the Sargassum are dependent on each other for survival.

In 1905, when Bernard Baruch bought Hobcaw Barony,there were many African Americans living there.

A storm surge is a mound of ocean water that moves ashore with a hurricane.  It is caused by high winds of a hurricane pushing on the ocean's surface and the low pressure at the hurricane's center.

This activity works well as an introduction to learning about the Civil War.

This is a lesson plan from The Powder House, South Carolina's oldest public building. 1. The student will identify three reasons for the location of the defense wall. 2. The student will illustrate the location of the defense wall.

Students will learn about the Transcontinental Railroad, its importance in settling the west, and its impact on immigration and Native Americans. 

South Carolina has a long tradition of theatrical arts, from Dock Street Theatre in Charleston, to community theater and filmmaking in towns across the state.

Students act as advertising agents in this lesson. They use photographic evidence and Google Maps to track the existence of rail lines throughout South Carolina towns.

Barbecue has been a southern tradition for a long time and has become a very profitable business. In South Carolina, there are four types of barbecue (tomato, ketchup, mustard, and vinegar and pepper) which seem to be regionally located. .

In this activity, students will identify and analyze the historical data found within two newspapers reporting on Robert Smalls and the CSS Planter. 

Classroom activities and lesson plans as well as timelines about the Great Depression and the New Deal.

South Carolina consists of urban, suburban, and rural communities. Students will utilize maps to label and describe the different land use classifications. 

The Battle of Kings Mountain is an excellent example of how landscape and geography can affect the outcome of events.

This lesson focuses on cause and effect, a Social Studies skill, and synthesizing, a literacy skill. Students will analyze three different tragedies and determine the effects of each.

This lesson is designed to give students a better understanding of life in Charleston during the Civil War.

GOAL: The goal of this lesson is for students to become familiar with the healing and patient care required for returning soldiers to battle.

GOAL: To introduce to students the role of African-Americans at the Battle of Cowpens in context of the Revolutionary struggle against England and the African-American struggle for freedom.

To have students define what kind of habitat an animal would have needed to survive in the upper Piedmont of the Carolinas prior to the Battle of Cowpens.

As a supervisory employee of South Carolina’s Department of Transportation with a budget of $2 million dollars, you will be required to choose one issue from the list below or propose an issue not listed.

Students apply their understanding of density to determine differences in four unknown salt solutions, using critical thinking skills, testing and observations.

GOAL: To have students work with primary sources related to the Battle of Cowpens.

Use the classroom activity to investigate how deep the energy of a wave goes and the relationship between the size of a wave and depth of wave energy.

Learn how to use a backstrap loom to make a Natural Weaving using items in nature. 

This lesson provides students an opportunity to read and interpret writings of the late 1500's and to transfer the information provided in the writings into a visual medium as a means of understanding and interpretation.

This activity is designed to help students learn about the types of items from the culture under study that would be preserved in the archaeological record.

Property: Dizzy Gillespie Birthplace HM, 337 Huger Street, Cheraw, SC 2952 

Historic Content

This lesson is based on the National Register of Historic Places registration files "Georgetown County Rice Culture, c. 1750-c. 1910" and "Chicora Wood Plantation" as well as other source materials on the rice culture of Georgetown County.

Students will determine key uses of the land in the watershed and infer the impact of land uses on the estuary's water quality and its inhabitants.

Reference skills, maps and the atlas are important reference sources.

Native Americans have been inhabitants of South Carolina for more than 15,000 years. These people contributed in countless ways to the state we call home.

The histories of local rivers provide insight into the effect of population growth on a natural resource and the cumulative impact of individual actions. Students will be able to:

During the 1930s, many tenant farmers experienced a number of years of hardship due to the Great Depression. In addition, many black farmers moved out of the South to try to find better lives for themselves in Northern cities. 

Property: William H. Johnson Birthplace Historic Marker, Palmetto Street, Florence

Historic Content 

Use the classroom activity to investigate the factors affecting wind waves.

From hometown soldiers and nurses to Camp Sevier in Greenville, South Carolina was deeply invested in World War I.

This unit focuses on explaining change and continuity over time and across cultures.

This unit focuses on explaining change and continuity over time and across cultures. The purpose of this unit is to engage 6th grade students in examining both historical and contemporary inequities that exist within social structures.